Usuario: Contraseña:      ¿Olvidó la clave?   registrar

Usuarios revisando este tema :   1 Invitados:





WCG - Outsmart Ebola Together: Nuevo Proyecto
Interesado en Boinc
Registrado:
20/6/2013 11:28
Desde: España
Grupo:
Usuarios Inscritos
Mensajes: 39
Ausente
Open in new window




The Problem

The Ebola virus is a significant health threat and is causing a growing humanitarian crisis in Africa, with potential to spread further due to human travel or expansion of the natural reservoir of animal hosts. It is a disease that kills 25% to 90% of infected victims and spreads human-to-human, often when patients are cared for or buried.

Currently, there are no proven treatments or vaccines for the disease. Although some have proposed using drugs developed for other viruses to attempt to fight Ebola, these drugs function against molecules that don't exist in Ebola and it is unclear if these treatments will be helpful. A better course of action is to leverage the wealth of scientific information that already exists for the Ebola virus to develop new, specific drugs. The molecular structures of Ebola virus's most important molecules have recently been solved, and represent rich, untapped opportunities for developing much-needed cures to fight this and future epidemics.

Ebola in humans and animals

The Ebola virus was first identified in 1976 and is closely related to the Marburg, Sudan and Reston viruses and other members of the filovirus family. In 2014 alone, one strain of Ebola virus caused the major outbreak in West Africa, a different strain of Ebola virus caused a separate, smaller outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the Marburg virus killed in Uganda. The Sudan virus has caused multiple outbreaks over the years in Central Africa, and the Reston virus has been identified in China and the Philippines on multiple ranches of swine being raised for human consumption. Fruit bats are thought to act as the natural reservoir of the Ebola virus; other animals become infected as well. Migration of bats or other animals may have spread the virus to West Africa ten years ago, where it remained until a spillover into the human population in December 2013 triggered the current major outbreak. As of November 2014, Ebola virus has infected over 14,000 people and killed at least 5,000 in West Africa.



Symptoms of Ebola

The virus, which is shaped like a long, flexible filament, attaches to and drives itself into the cells of a host organism. It then replicates efficiently, budding out numerous copies of itself from the cell. The virus attacks several types of cells, including important cells of the immune system that circulate and carry the virus throughout the body. The damage includes inappropriate clotting, leakage from blood vessels, inflammation, organ failure and shock. When a person is first infected, there is a two- to 21-day incubation period before the infected person shows symptoms. Initial symptoms can closely resemble those caused by flu or common tropical diseases and progress to include high fever, vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration and more. Contact with an infected person's bodily fluids or the body of a patient that died from the disease can infect the next person. Because of the variable incubation period, and the similarity of initial symptoms to much more mundane diseases, it is important to track and isolate all possible contacts of an infected person to contain an outbreak.

Impact of Ebola on communities

Ebola is potentially a very serious threat, not only because of the severity of the disease itself, but also because of the fear it instills in a community. If not handled properly, an outbreak can turn into an epidemic and overwhelm the health services in a given area. As a result, the ability to treat other diseases or provide prenatal care is interrupted. Trade is interrupted, and the entire welfare and economy of a region can deteriorate. This is already happening in some West African countries, particularly Liberia and Sierra Leone. Because of the long incubation period and our highly connected modern world, Ebola can easily spread into other geographies after an initial outbreak. Extreme precautions and preparation are required in handling suspected patients and finding possible contacts who may also be infected.

The search for a cure

The search for an effective antiviral drug to treat the disease is now a high priority, given the mortality rate, the scope of the 2014 outbreak and the resulting possibility that the virus could become endemic in one or more areas. Some compounds show promise as treatments for Ebola and are currently being tested through fast-tracked studies. However, scientists are still looking urgently for a definitive cure, and more must be done.

The Proposed Solution

In this project, researchers in the Ollmann Saphire laboratory of The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California are using World Community Grid to search for drugs to treat patients infected with the Ebola virus. An antiviral treatment for Ebola could potentially also be used to treat related diseases in the filovirus family, including the Marburg, Sudan and Reston viruses.

The computational power donated by World Community Grid volunteers is being used to screen millions of compounds to identify ones that show promise in disabling the Ebola virus. Performing this screening virtually saves many years of laboratory work.

Screening candidate drug molecules

The software used for these screenings is called AutoDock and AutoDock VINA, developed by the Olson Laboratory at The Scripps Research Institute, which has also partnered with World Community Grid on two other projects: FightAIDS@Home and GO Fight Against Malaria.

The atomic structure of the target Ebola virus molecule and the structures of millions of candidate drug molecules (ligands) are inputs to the program. The target and ligand are evaluated in all orientations against one another, and the software computes the binding affinity between the molecules. This is analogous to what would be done in laboratory test tubes, but it is simulated virtually using computers. This saves considerable time and cost, because laboratory testing requires purchasing or synthesizing the candidate molecules, a potentially time-consuming and expensive process.

Ebola virus molecule targets

This project is aided by the unique expertise in Ebola virus structural biology in the Ollmann Saphire laboratory at The Scripps Research Institute. This lab has solved the structures of nearly all the critical target proteins of the virus. These structures, or molecular images, are like reconnaissance: they show where the virus is vulnerable, and which specific sites should be hit to block key stages of the virus life cycle. The lab also has the tools and ability to biologically evaluate each compound at each stage of the virus life cycle in different cellular assays.

The first target will be the surface protein on the Ebola virus that is solely responsible for infection of new human cells. Recent work from this lab demonstrates that Ebola and its relatives, the Sudan, Marburg and Reston viruses, use a similarly shaped site to infect human cells. Compounds developed against this site could be developed into drugs against any of this family of viruses.

The second target will be newly discovered shape-shifting "transformer" proteins of the Ebola virus, which adopt different forms at different times to achieve different functions. With this project, we have the opportunity to make fundamental insights into molecular biology in general, understanding how not just the proteins of Ebola, but those of human cells as well, may leverage minimal genetic code into maximum biological function.

Developing a treatment for Ebola

Once the best candidate drug molecules have been identified through virtual screening on World Community Grid, they can then be tested in the lab to determine effectiveness against a real viral infection. The most promising drug candidates can then be further modified to perform even better, at lower concentrations and with fewer side effects. Drug trials with the most promising drug candidates could ultimately lead to an approved medicine.

Project Goals

The goals of the Outsmart Ebola Together project are to:

•Screen millions of compounds from multiple library databases against critical Ebola virus targets.

•Identify the best candidates and perform further laboratory tests on those to identify promising drug leads for effective Ebola treatment.

•Provide the results to other scientists around the world who are working to fight Ebola.

Support this Project

You can help researchers find a cure for Ebola by donating your computing power to this project, encouraging others to join, and also by contributing to The Scripps Research Institute's crowdfunding campaign to secure additional resources needed to analyze the enormous volume of data generated by Outsmart Ebola Together.




Open in new window





El problema

El virus del Ébola es una amenaza importante para la salud y está causando una creciente crisis humanitaria en África, con el potencial de propagarse aún más debido a los viajes o la ampliación de la reserva natural de los ejércitos de los animales humanos. Es una enfermedad que mata a 25% y el 90% de las víctimas infectadas y se propaga de humano a humano, a menudo cuando los pacientes son atendidos o enterrados.

Actualmente, no existen tratamientos comprobados o vacunas para la enfermedad. Aunque algunos han propuesto el uso de medicamentos desarrollados para otros virus para tratar de luchar contra el Ébola, estos medicamentos funcionan contra las moléculas que no existen en el Ébola y no está claro si estos tratamientos serán de utilidad. La mejor línea de acción es aprovechar la gran cantidad de información científica que ya existe para el virus Ébola para desarrollar nuevos medicamentos específicos. Las estructuras moleculares de las moléculas más importantes del virus Ebola se han resuelto recientemente, y representan importantes oportunidades sin explotar para el desarrollo de curas muy necesarias para combatir esta y futuras epidemias.



Ebola en seres humanos y animales

El virus Ébola fue identificado por primera vez en 1976 y está estrechamente relacionado con los virus de Marburg, Sudán y Reston y otros miembros de la familia filovirus. Tan sólo en 2014, una cepa de virus de Ébola causó el brote importante en África occidental, una cepa diferente del virus Ébola causó un brote separado, más pequeño en la República Democrática del Congo, y el virus de Marburg muerto en Uganda. El virus de Sudán ha causado varios brotes en los últimos años en el África central, y el virus Reston ha sido identificado en China y Filipinas en varios ranchos de cerdos criados para el consumo humano. Los murciélagos frugívoros se cree que actúan como depósito natural del virus Ébola; otros animales se infectan también. La migración de los murciélagos y otros animales se ha propagado el virus a África Occidental hace diez años, donde permaneció hasta que un desbordamiento en la población humana en diciembre de 2013 provocó el brote importante actual. A partir de noviembre de 2014, el virus Ébola ha infectado a más de 14.000 personas y mató al menos a 5.000 en el África occidental.


Los síntomas del Ébola

El virus, que tiene la forma de un filamento largo, flexible, se adhiere a sí mismo y conduce a las células de un organismo huésped. A continuación, se replica de manera eficiente, en ciernes a cabo numerosas copias de sí mismo a partir de la célula. El virus ataca varios tipos de células, incluyendo las células importantes del sistema inmune que circulan y llevan el virus en todo el cuerpo. El daño incluye coagulación inadecuada, fuga de los vasos sanguíneos, inflamación, insuficiencia orgánica y shock. Cuando una persona está infectada primero, hay un período de incubación de dos a 21 días antes de que la persona infectada muestra síntomas. Los síntomas iniciales pueden acercarse a las causadas por la gripe o enfermedades tropicales comunes y el progreso para incluir fiebre alta, vómitos, diarrea, deshidratación y más. Contacta con los fluidos corporales de una persona infectada o el cuerpo de un paciente que murió de la enfermedad puede infectar a la siguiente persona. Debido a que el período de incubación variable y la similitud de los síntomas iniciales a las enfermedades mucho más mundanas, es importante hacer un seguimiento y aislar todas las posibles contactos de una persona infectada a contener un brote.


El Impacto de Ébola sobre las comunidades

El ébola es potencialmente una amenaza muy grave, no sólo debido a la gravedad de la enfermedad en sí, sino también por el temor que infunde en una comunidad. Si no se maneja adecuadamente, un brote puede convertirse en una epidemia y desbordar los servicios de salud en un área determinada. Como resultado, la capacidad para tratar otras enfermedades o proporcionar atención interrumpida. El comercio se interrumpe, y todo el bienestar y la economía de una región se puede deteriorar. Esto ya está ocurriendo en algunos países de África occidental, en particular Liberia y Sierra Leona. Debido al largo período de incubación y de nuestro mundo moderno altamente conectado, el ébola puede propagarse fácilmente a otras geografías después de un brote inicial. Se deben tomar precauciones extremas y preparación en el manejo de pacientes sospechosos y encontrar posibles contactos que también pueden estar infectados.


La búsqueda de una cura

La búsqueda de un medicamento antiviral eficaz para tratar la enfermedad es ahora una prioridad, dada la tasa de mortalidad, el alcance del brote de 2014 y la consiguiente posibilidad de que el virus puede hacerse endémico en una o más áreas. Algunos compuestos prometedores como tratamientos para el Ébola y actualmente se están probando a través de estudios por la vía rápida. Sin embargo, los científicos todavía están buscando con urgencia una cura definitiva, y más se debe hacer.


La solución propuesta

En este proyecto, los investigadores en el laboratorio Ollmann Saphire del Instituto de Investigación Scripps en La Jolla, California están utilizando el World Community Grid para buscar fármacos para tratar a los pacientes infectados con el virus del Ébola. Un tratamiento antiviral para Ébola podría, potencialmente, también puede utilizarse para tratar enfermedades relacionadas en la familia filovirus, incluyendo los virus Marburg, Reston y Sudán.

El poder de cómputo donado por los voluntarios de World Community Grid está siendo utilizado para detectar millones de compuestos e identificar los que se presentan prometedores en la desactivación del virus Ébola. Realizar esta prueba prácticamente ahorra muchos años de trabajo en el laboratorio.


La detección moléculas de fármacos candidatos

El software utilizado para estos exámenes se llama AutoDock y AutoDock VINA, desarrollado por el Laboratorio de Olson en el Scripps Research Institute, que también se ha asociado con World Community Grid en otros dos proyectos: Lucha contra el sida y Lucha contra malaria.

La estructura atómica de la molécula de virus Ebola objetivo y las estructuras de millones de moléculas del fármaco candidato (ligandos) son entradas al programa. El objetivo y el ligando se evalúan en todas las orientaciones uno contra el otro, y el software calcula la afinidad de unión entre las moléculas. Esto es análogo a lo que se hace en tubos de ensayo de laboratorio, pero se simula prácticamente el uso de ordenadores. Esto ahorra mucho tiempo y dinero, ya que las pruebas de laboratorio requiere la compra o la síntesis de las moléculas candidatas, un proceso potencialmente largo y costoso.


Objetivos de moléculas de virus del Ébola

Este proyecto es ayudado por la experiencia única en la biología estructural del virus Ebola en el laboratorio Ollmann Saphire en el Instituto de Investigación Scripps. Este laboratorio ha resuelto las estructuras de casi todas las proteínas diana críticos del virus. Estas estructuras, o imágenes moleculares, son como reconocimiento: muestran donde el virus es vulnerable, y que los sitios específicos deberían verse afectados para bloquear las etapas clave del ciclo de vida del virus. El laboratorio también tiene las herramientas y capacidad de evaluar biológicamente cada compuesto en cada etapa del ciclo de vida del virus en diferentes ensayos celulares.

El primer objetivo será la proteína de superficie del virus de Ébola que es el único responsable de la infección de nuevas células humanas. Un trabajo reciente de esta práctica de laboratorio demuestra que el Ébola y sus familiares, los virus de Sudán, Marburg y Reston, use un sitio de forma similar para infectar células humanas. Los compuestos desarrollados contra este sitio podrían desarrollarse en las drogas contra cualquiera de esta familia de virus.

El segundo objetivo estará proteínas "transformador" que cambian de forma del virus Ébola, que adoptan diferentes formas en diferentes momentos para conseguir diferentes funciones recientemente descubierto. Con este proyecto, tenemos la oportunidad de hacer ideas fundamentales de la biología molecular, en general, la comprensión de cómo no sólo las proteínas de Ebola, pero los de las células humanas, así, pueden aprovechar código genético mínima en función biológica máxima.

El desarrollo de un tratamiento para el ébola

Una vez que las mejores moléculas del fármaco candidato han sido identificados través de la investigación virtual de World Community Grid, que luego pueden ser probados en el laboratorio para determinar la efectividad contra una infección viral real. Los fármacos candidatos más prometedores se pueden modificar aún más para llevar a cabo aún mejor, a concentraciones más bajas y con menos efectos secundarios. Los ensayos de medicamentos con los fármacos candidatos más prometedores podrían en última instancia conducir a un medicamento aprobado.

Objetivos del proyecto

Los objetivos del proyecto Juntos Outsmart Ebola son:

•Detectar millones de compuestos de múltiples bases de datos de la biblioteca contra objetivos críticos de virus de Ébola.

•Identificar a los mejores candidatos y realizar más pruebas de laboratorio en los que para identificar clientes potenciales fármacos prometedores para el tratamiento eficaz del Ébola.

•Proporcionar los resultados a otros científicos de todo el mundo que están trabajando para luchar contra el Ébola.


Apoya este proyecto

Puedes ayudar los investigadores a encontrar una cura para el ébola donando tu potencia de cálculo para este proyecto, animando a otros a unirse, y también contribuyendo a la campaña de de crowdfunding del Instituto de Investigación Scripps de obtener recursos adicionales necesarios para analizar la enorme cantidad de datos generados por Outsmart Ébola juntos.



Enviado el: 3/12/2014 16:31

Editado por ljfc2001 enviado el 3/12/2014 22:37:26
Editado por ljfc2001 enviado el 3/12/2014 22:42:33
_________________
Open in new window

Open in new window
Transferir el mensaje a otras aplicaciones Transferir a


Re: WCG - Outsmart Ebola Together: Nuevo Proyecto
Moderador
Registrado:
18/10/2006 11:39
Desde: Córdoba - España
Grupo:
Moderadores
Comprometido con Boinc
Mensajes: 5827
Ausente
Magnífico post. Gracias.

Enviado el: 3/12/2014 23:28
_________________
Open in new window

Open in new window
Transferir el mensaje a otras aplicaciones Transferir a


Re: WCG - Outsmart Ebola Together: Nuevo Proyecto
Moderador
Registrado:
25/3/2008 0:36
Desde: Pontevedra
Grupo:
Moderadores
Mensajes: 4355
Ausente
El sub proyecto lo merece.

Enviado el: 4/12/2014 22:05
_________________
Open in new window

Open in new window
Transferir el mensaje a otras aplicaciones Transferir a


Re: WCG - Outsmart Ebola Together: Nuevo Proyecto
Comprometido con Boinc
Registrado:
19/12/2010 11:14
Desde: Navarra - España
Grupo:
Comprometido con Boinc
Mensajes: 822
Ausente
Hola,

Me han entrado dos tareas de este subproyecto (todas las demás de UGM). Una de ellas "normal", la otra beta... curioso.

Saludos.

Enviado el: 5/12/2014 0:16
_________________
Open in new window

Open in new windowOpen in new window
Transferir el mensaje a otras aplicaciones Transferir a


Re: WCG - Outsmart Ebola Together: Nuevo Proyecto
Interesado en Boinc
Registrado:
20/6/2013 11:28
Desde: España
Grupo:
Usuarios Inscritos
Mensajes: 39
Ausente
Muchas gracias ljfc2001 por la reedición. Así está mucho mejor.


Enviado el: 5/12/2014 8:40
_________________
Open in new window

Open in new window
Transferir el mensaje a otras aplicaciones Transferir a


Re: WCG - Outsmart Ebola Together: Nuevo Proyecto
Comprometido con Boinc
Registrado:
19/12/2010 11:14
Desde: Navarra - España
Grupo:
Comprometido con Boinc
Mensajes: 822
Ausente
Acotación:

Hongo escribió:
Hola,

Me han entrado dos tareas de este subproyecto (todas las demás de UGM). Una de ellas "normal", la otra beta... curioso.

Saludos.


Para continuar... la beta de la versión 7.07, "solo" ha llevado 23h. Cuando la unidad de las 7.08, unos 2h....
Me da que les quedaban algunas con error de la versión vieja aún coleando...

Enviado el: 7/12/2014 12:14
_________________
Open in new window

Open in new windowOpen in new window
Transferir el mensaje a otras aplicaciones Transferir a


Re: WCG - Outsmart Ebola Together: Nuevo Proyecto
Moderador
Registrado:
25/3/2008 0:36
Desde: Pontevedra
Grupo:
Moderadores
Mensajes: 4355
Ausente
Ya tenemos unidades de Outsmart Ebola Together disponibles.

Enviado el: 12/2/2015 16:19
_________________
Open in new window

Open in new window
Transferir el mensaje a otras aplicaciones Transferir a






Puede ver mensajes.
No puede enviar mensajes.
No puede responder mensajes.
No puede editar mensajes.
No puede eliminar mensajes.
No puede crear encuestas.
No puede votar.
No puede adjuntar archivos.
No puede hacer un envío sin aprobación.

[Búsqueda Avanzada]


 

CANAL@Boinc 1997-2008  |  Diseño Rafa Hens sobre idea original de Fran | Reservados todos los derechos